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1 10-Dec-2017 Ten Effective Negotiation Skills Continued from last week

4. Emotional Control

It is vital that a negotiator have the ability to keep his emotions in check during the negotiation. While a negotiation on contentious issues can be frustrating, allowing emotions to take control during the meeting can lead to unfavorable results. For example, a manager frustrated with the lack of progress during a salary negotiation may concede more than is acceptable to the organization in an attempt to end the frustration. On the other hand, employees negotiating a pay raise may become too emotionally involved to accept a compromise with management and take an all or nothing approach, which breaks down the communication between the two parties.

5. Verbal Communication

Negotiators must have the ability to communicate clearly and effectively to the other side during the negotiation. Misunderstandings can occur if the negotiator does not state his case clearly. During a bargaining meeting, an effective negotiator must have the skills to state his desired outcome as well as his reasoning.

6. Collaboration and Teamwork

Negotiation is not necessarily a one side against another arrangement. Effective negotiators must have the skills to work together as a team and foster a collaborative atmosphere during negotiations. Those involved in a negotiation on both sides of the issue must work together to reach an agreeable solution.

7. Problem Solving

Individuals with negotiation skills have the ability to seek a variety of solutions to problems. Instead of focusing on his ultimate goal for the negotiation, the individual with skills can focus on solving the problem, which may be a breakdown in communication, to benefit both sides of the issue.

8. Decision Making Ability

Leaders with negotiation skills have the ability to act decisively during a negotiation. It may be necessary during a bargaining arrangement to agree to a compromise quickly to end a stalemate.

9. Interpersonal Skills

Effective negotiators have the interpersonal skills to maintain a good working relationship with those involved in the negotiation. Negotiators with patience and the ability to persuade others without using manipulation can maintain a positive atmosphere during a difficult negotiation.

10. Ethics and Reliability

Ethical standards and reliability in an effective negotiator promote a trusting environment for negotiations. Both sides in a negotiation must trust that the other party will follow through on promises and agreements. A negotiator must have the skills to execute on his promises after bargaining ends.

Culled from Smallbusiness.chron.com and adapted
2 03-Dec-2017 Ten Effective Negotiation Skills
As Yakubu Mohammed’s business grew, he knew there would soon come a time when he would be unable to handle everything by himself. As a small-scale produce dealer, he had to deal with a number of suppliers from time to time. Often that also meant negotiating prices, terms of delivery, plus quality as well. As he was planning to expand, thinking of additional staff to hire, he decided he had to include negotiation skills as key requirement for new staff. He contacted a friend, Mumuni, who shared these tips with him from what he had read somewhere:

1. Problem Analysis

Effective negotiators must have the skills to analyze a problem to determine the interests of each party in the negotiation. A detailed problem analysis identifies the issue, the interested parties and the outcome goals. For example, in an employer and employee contract negotiation, the problem or area where the parties disagree may be in salary or benefits. Identifying the issues for both sides can help to find a compromise for all parties.

2. Preparation

Before entering a bargaining meeting, the skilled negotiator prepares for the meeting. Preparation includes determining goals, areas for trade and alternatives to the stated goals. In addition, negotiators study the history of the relationship between the two parties and past negotiations to find areas of agreement and common goals. Past precedents and outcomes can set the tone for current negotiations.

3. Active Listening

Negotiators have the skills to listen actively to the other party during the debate. Active listening involves the ability to read body language as well as verbal communication. It is important to listen to the other party to find areas for compromise during the meeting. Instead of spending the bulk of the time in negotiation expounding the virtues of his viewpoint, the skilled negotiator will spend more time listening to the other party.

4. Emotional Control

It is vital that a negotiator have the ability to keep his emotions in check during the negotiation. While a negotiation on contentious issues can be frustrating, allowing emotions to take control during the meeting can lead to unfavorable results. For example, a manager frustrated with the lack of progress during a salary negotiation may concede more than is acceptable to the organization in an attempt to end the frustration. On the other hand, employees negotiating a pay raise may become too emotionally involved to accept a compromise with management and take an all or nothing approach, which breaks down the communication between the two parties.

…to be continued next week

Culled from Smallbusiness.chron.com and adapted

3 26-Nov-2017 New Business Idea? How to Test It Before Launching
Nsikak Essien had been thinking about the “next big thing” for a very long time. His problem was how to start. He had put it so much time and energy into think and analyzing and he knew it was time to get started. Just do something. But how? How will he test his big idea and the hedge potential risks? In his quest for a solution, he met a friend, Akpan Obot, who had been there before. Akpan shared these tips with him.

Do you have an idea for the "next big thing"? You may think your idea is perfect the way it is, but it's wise to test it out before you spend a lot of time and money developing a business or product for which there's no market. Here are six steps to help you make sure your product is something the world wants, before you launch it.

1. First wait; then build a prototype or test service.

Although you're excited about your new business idea, you might want to wait a while before testing it. A venture capitalist and serial entrepreneur, said in a 2014 interview,
"After I've gone through the process of writing down a bunch of ideas, I don't like to rush into building a business plan or recruiting the team. I like to wait a few weeks, [to] see which ideas really stick with me."

2. Build a minimum viable product.

A minimum viable product, or MVP, is the simplest form of your idea that you can actually sell as product. Using the principles of Lean Six Sigma, the entrepreneur is advised to test and market early in the development process so that any tweaks or changes are in response to real feedback from the target audience.

3. Run it by a group of critics.

When you have your first prototype or test service ready, take it to your potential target customers. You should talk [to] and/or survey at least 50 potential customers, to see if they identify with the problem the same way you do. In other words, you need to find out if this is a real problem for a majority of your target market, or just a few.

4. Tweak it to suit your test market.

An inventor took a similar approach to testing 5by, an Internet video finder app he developed and has since sold. The inventor and his team went to college campuses and showed mock-ups of what the product was going to look like. They found the feedback from students invaluable in fine-tuning the original idea.

5. Create a test website with social media tie-ins.

Once the word is out about your product or business, the target market needs a place to get more information about it or to show it to their friends. Building a simple website and using social media are ideal tools to provide information and monitor how many people are interested in what you are selling.
You'll be able to tell if the idea will get traction from the number of click-throughs on the ads, and the number of people who fill in your form.

6. Create a marketing plan and use it.

All of the preparatory work means nothing if you do not perform enough actions to get a good measure of response. Once you have a viable product, you need to be able to act on the interest in it. Make a list of 100 things you can do to market the product, and then execute that list of 100, and in the process, speak with 1,000 people about the product.
If you do this, you will have data on your product. You'll know who is interested in it, what marketing strategies worked and didn't work, and how you can improve, all of which are invaluable steps in getting your idea and business off the ground.

Culled from Businessnewsdaily.com and adapted
4 18-Nov-2017 10 Tips to Effectively Manage Vendors and Suppliers Continued from last week

8. Pay On Time

Your supplier does a job and should be compensated for it. Consider the last time a customer was late paying you. Even if they had told you the check would be a few days late, consider the slight annoyance you felt at having to wait, and the relief you felt when the check finally arrived. Paying your vendors on time demonstrates that you respect them and the work they do.

9. Stay Flexible

This is different than planning for disasters or setbacks in your production schedule. Staying flexible means adapting to everyday issues that arise.

10. Continuously Work on Strengthening Your Relationship

Look for opportunities outside of general day-to-day contact. If you have a quarterly meeting or invite your suppliers to come and visit your facility, make sure to spend time with them and forge stronger bonds. Ask your suppliers for feedback. Encourage them to have open discussions with you about ways that the relationship could work better or more efficiently. Supplier relationships are partnerships and as such, are also a two-way street.

Forming long-lasting and mutually beneficial relationships with suppliers will aid you in keeping your manufacturing schedule on time and ensure that you make and sell quality products. These reasons are important enough to make sure that you manage your supplier relationships well.

To learn more about how to work with suppliers, read our article on how to negotiate the best deal with your suppliers.

Culled from quickbooks.intuit and adapted
5 11-Nov-2017 10 Tips to Effectively Manage Vendors and Suppliers
For sometime now, Valerie Ubaka has been having sleepless nights over how to deal with her vendors and suppliers.
She has a bakery and she depends on third parties for the supply of a number of ingredients to guarantee quality, timely delivery and the maintenance of her equipment.

Lately, they have let her down so badly; she finally caught up with a friend who shared the following tips with her:

1. Choose Wisely

If you have the luxury of choosing from multiple suppliers, take the time to examine each one’s pros and cons. Determine which one can give you what you need, when you need it and for the right price. Evaluate everything from their response time to their contract terms to their costs. Relationships are most successful if they have the time to grow, so you want to select a supplier that you and your organization will be able to grow with.


2. Communicate

The easiest way to engender ill-will in any relationship is by a lack of communication. Take the time to communicate with your suppliers and ask for the same type of outreach in return. This is especially important regarding timelines. If a project timeline changes, your supplier should be one of the first people to know. An earlier alert keeps them in the loop and could make a mutually agreed upon solution possible. Your supplier should be able to problem-solve and troubleshoot issues pertaining to material quality and delivery, so use these traits to your advantage when you’re facing difficulties. Also, remember to not use communication as a way to test your suppliers. If you need them to meet a specific date, explicitly tell them. Don’t ask them to guess or read your mind and then be surprised when they can’t.


3. Understand Their Business

While you don’t need to necessarily understand every nuance about a supplier’s business model or operating procedures, having a general working knowledge of their policies will help you to better understand their values. It will also give you context to the challenges they face, which is especially important if you work in a business with shifting priorities and deadlines that requires a great amount of flexibility. If you understand why a supplier might say “no”, it makes it much easier to plan ahead.

4. Plan for Contingencies

There are normal everyday contingencies you should plan for, like late shipments or weather-ruined pallets. There are also major disruptions to plan for, like natural disasters or critical equipment failure. Most of these contingencies will probably be developed in-house, but you should make a concession for your suppliers and make sure they have a clear understanding of how you will expect them to behave should the unthinkable happen.


5. Put as Much Thought Into Rewards as Penalties

Penalties are there for those times when someone does not hold up his or her end of the deal. With that in mind, there should also be a reward for when work is above and beyond expectations. Thinking about worst-case scenarios is important, but also assume that suppliers will exceed your expectations, and that they should be rewarded when they do. A reward could be an especially prompt payment or a simple “Thank You” note.


6. Accept Accountability

Both the client and the supplier are responsible for the success or failure of the working relationship. Accept accountability for your place in the process by acknowledging that your decisions, delayed timing or changes in project scope directly impact the supplier’s ability to do his or her job well.

7. Invest in Supplier Management Software

This is really to preserve your sanity or the sanity of your office manager. Supplier relationship management (SRM) software is especially important as the number of suppliers you work with grows. It can be used to monitor supplier performance and keep all of your supplier details in one place. Many SRM programs also interface with accounting software, making for a seamless invoicing experience.

8. Pay On Time

Your supplier does a job and should be compensated for it. Consider the last time a customer was late paying you. Even if they had told you the check would be a few days late, consider the slight annoyance you felt at having to wait, and the relief you felt when the check finally arrived. Paying your vendors on time demonstrates that you respect them and the work they do.


9. Stay Flexible

This is different than planning for disasters or setbacks in your production schedule. Staying flexible means adapting to everyday issues that arise.

10. Continuously Work on Strengthening Your Relationship

Look for opportunities outside of general day-to-day contact. If you have a quarterly meeting or invite your suppliers to come and visit your facility, make sure to spend time with them and forge stronger bonds. Ask your suppliers for feedback. Encourage them to have open discussions with you about ways that the relationship could work better or more efficiently. Supplier relationships are partnerships and as such, are also a two-way street.

Forming long-lasting and mutually beneficial relationships with suppliers will aid you in keeping your manufacturing schedule on time and ensure that you make and sell quality products. These reasons are important enough to make sure that you manage your supplier relationships well.

To learn more about how to work with suppliers, read our article on how to negotiate the best deal with your suppliers.

Culled from quickbooks.intuit and adapted

6 28-Oct-2017 Six Dependable Tips For Product Packaging
There’s a common saying that the difference between “pure water” and bottled water is packaging. Although this saying is exaggerated, it highlights the difference that packaging can bring to a product.

Mohammed Tanimu has been making kilishi for over five years -- cutting up slabs of beef into flat wafers of stick and dousing the meat with pepper over a pot of coal. That was the way those before him prepared kilishi and that is the tradition he has maintained.

But when he heard of a group of young men putting kilishi on the shelf of leading supermarkets in the country and even preparing to export the product, he decided it was time to learn a bit more about how to do his business differently. 

In his quest for innovative packaging, he found this piece of advice very useful: Most consumers make decisions on which products to buy purely based on instinct. Eye-tracking studies show that consumers read, on average, only seven words in an entire shopping trip, which means they are, instead, buying instinctively by color, shape and familiarity of location. 

Below are six secrets to create successful packaging that will catch the eye of the shopper:

1. The Five-Year-Old Test

If you can describe your brand to a five-year-old, send them into a store to find it, and have them actually pick out the product, your brand package has created an iconic connection. The key to this iconic connection is to have a distinctive brand mark that will keep consumers coming back and looking for it every time they are at the store. For example, if you ask a child to find the blue package with a black and white cookie and a glass of milk, they will come back with Oreos.

2. Show Your Lighter Side

Elements of wit and humor create emotional connections with consumers and break through the industry clutter. When Redhook beer revamped their packaging, they created a series of label headlines that used their distinctive brand voice to describe each flavor. Their Long Hammer IPA is “a big fan of dry hopping, which sounds much dirtier than it is,” and their Copper Hook “thinks gold and silver are way overrated.”

3. Opt For A Throwback

Whether it’s posting a throwback photo on Instagram or watching your favorite NFL team play in their old-school jerseys, our culture loves bringing back a classic look. The same is true for brands and their packaging. Many companies are bringing back classic designs and flavors to create a sense of nostalgia and remind consumers why they first fell in love with a brand. It’s about recreating an emotional connection and building a bridge to the evolution of the brand.

4. Establish Authentic Partnerships

After many brands loosely incorporated the pink breast cancer awareness ribbon to their products, consumers began to criticize brands that were falsely advertising partnerships with causes. If your brand is considering partnering with a charitable organization, your company should be completely committed and the cause should align closely with your overall brand.

5. Pick Appealing Colors

Color is one of the most important elements when it comes to designing your packaging. Color can make your design pop and give it a unified appearance. Take the time to pick out the best colors for your product, and keep in mind of your brand and target audience.

6. Design With Your Store In Mind

It is important to keep in mind where your product is going to be sold. For example, if you’re designing a package that will need to be displayed in the freezer section of the grocery store, think about how the doors could obscure your design. When designing your product packaging, consider the obstructions, layout and other elements that will influence how consumers see your product on the shelf.

Effective packaging helps consumers understand at a glance who, what and why the product is relevant in their life. 


Culled from imagine-express.com and adapted.
7 21-Oct-2017 Useful Tips on How To Boost End-Of-Year Sales With Social Media – Part 2 Continued from last week

Step No. 3: Connect

Friend, follow or connect with individuals with profiles that match your clients’. How do you do this? Conduct a search on each social networking website or use a resource to find people who are talking about your industry or using related keywords. Then comment on their posts, re-tweet them, answer a question or share something they say. By contributing to their conversation, you add value to their network. Then it becomes natural for you to follow them and for them to follow you back. Once you connect, don’t immediately bombard them with pitches. Instead, read their profiles, get to know them and identify their needs.

Step No. 4: Build relationships

The most important thing salespeople need to know is that they need to develop relationships more than they need to develop leads, because good relationships will turn into leads. People share a lot of information, and if you monitor and listen to what they are saying, you will eventually be able to engage in a meaningful conversation with them. Once you develop a relationship, you can tell the prospect how your product or service might be something they want or need.

Step No. 5: Engage in a conversation

If you just write them a message with a pitch and a link to your website, they will be uninterested. If you say, ‘Here are some solutions to your problem, maybe my product or service can help,’ they will know you care about them. If you really listen to what they are saying on social media, you can open doors and start a conversation without having to make a cold call. Other ways to do this: Create a Facebook group related to your product or service and invite prospects to join. Then, send targeted messages to members who are active within the group. Join the groups that your clients are members of on LinkedIn, as well. Engage in conversation there by answering questions that are asked and showcasing your expertise at problem solving in a specific area.

Twitter also offers opportunities to initiate dialogues. Although Twitter should be used as a listening tool, you can still engage in a conversation on the site. Listen to your prospects’ tweets and use them as trigger points to start a conversation on a business development call. Look for trends in their tweets. Are they launching new products? Buying new companies? Expanding to a new market? If any of those announcements could be a trigger for something you sell, call your prospect and mention that you saw the tweet. Ask them how it’s affecting their business and see if they would be interested in starting a conversation about how you can help.

If you share good content with your social networks, it can spread easily, increasing your visibility with new leads. A salesperson can also give better service when paying attention to customers online. And that can result in loyal customers for life.

Culled and adapted from Forbes.
8 14-Oct-2017 Useful Tips On How To Boost End-Of-Year Sales With Social Media
As the year winds down, many business owners and managers are thinking of how to cash in on end-of-year sales. Edem Kodjo is not an exception. An “old school” folk, he used posters, handbills and word-of-mouth to announce his end-of-year sales promotions in his shoe boutique in the last few years.

His success has been largely limited as local government council regulations about cleaner environment have reduced where he can paste his posters or share his handbills. He has also recently noticed that young customers who are his target are increasingly migrating to the social media. 

Before launching his sales promotion campaign this year, Edem spoke with a friend, who shared with him an advice he had read in a special publication online: 

 Social media allows salespeople to see what prospects are saying about their brand and competitors. You can really get to know a customer’s needs through social listening. It’s a great way to research a market and initiate conversation leading to a sale, regular or end-of-year.

Not only can social listening help you generate new leads, but it also allows you to build deeper relationships with existing clients that drives them to purchase again and again.

The biggest sales have come from salespeople using Twitter to find opportunities and LinkedIn to find the names of the true buyers inside organizations.

Facebook and blog platforms have proven to be essential for salespeople, as well.

Someone selling digital scrapbooking software and supplies, for example, can connect with his or her customers on Facebook and through a blog where they can share project ideas and digital photo advice. 

So how can you use social media to make sales, especially this end-of-year?

Step No. 1: Determine the best way to connect with prospects

Social media is a smart selling tool only if your clients and prospects are using social media. It’s a huge waste of your time if your clients are spending their time elsewhere.

But if you learn they are indeed using popular sites like Facebook, Twitter and LinkedIn, you need to determine which space is best for connecting and interacting with them.

Facebook is one of the best arenas for business to consumer sales.

It’s also important for brands to consider tools like Instagram and Pinterest along with their Facebook strategy to increase visibility and sales. LinkedIn is the appropriate platform for sales of business-to-business products or services. LinkedIn is a more professional networking environment, so this is the right place to connect with people at big corporations that might be interested in your product or service.

Step No. 2: Join a community and create a persona

It starts by spending some time with the tool you plan to use. Build up a personal account, have conversations, and become acquainted with the norms and expectations of the community.

Without misrepresenting yourself, create a persona that’s likable and trustworthy within that community. If I think you’re a jerk when I see you on a social media site, I’m not going to do business with you. If you comment a lot to get people to go to your site, I’m not going to listen to you. You can’t abuse or misuse social media.

Show your network that you’re an amiable, trustworthy resource.
9 07-Oct-2017 How To Know If Your Social Media Strategy Is Working
Since she launched her clothes selling business two years ago, Chioma Ebube has tried all sorts of social media “tricks” to help create awareness, and hopefully, improve sales. 

She is on Facebook, WhatsApp, Instagram and even Snapchat. At the onset it seemed to be working well, but in recent times, her enthusiasm has waned with falling traffic to her multiple platforms. 

Now, she is at a crossroads. If, like Chioma, you’ve written out your social media strategy with the steps you’ll take and the goals you want to achieve, how do you determine the impact you’re having?

These are just five of the many ways you can determine your strategy’s impact.

1. Vanity Metrics

While they’re not the highlight of your results, vanity metrics can help you quickly and easily see whether your activity is working. When you gain fans and followers, see more “Likes,” “favorites,” “shares,” and “re-tweets,” you can tell that what you’re publishing is drawing in interest.

Measure these metrics, and keep an eye on what types of content you’re sharing is bringing in the most interaction. You’ll learn what content works best and what period has the most activity.

2. Sales

After sharing on social media, ask your sales department staff whether they see an increase in activity on their end. Request they reach out to interested parties, asking how the person found out about your company.

If you learn that new customers are reaching out based on your social media activity, you’ll have evidence that your strategy is working, and your sales staff will appreciate it.

3. Website Traffic
 
Do you use Google Analytics to measure your website activity? Did you know this service can show you how social media plays a role in your website traffic?
In Google Analytics, you can set it up so you can see where your traffic is coming from. If you have visitors coming directly from your social media accounts, you’ll know that they were interested in you based on your activity.

4. Workload
 
Although you might question whether this is a good thing, you will see an increase in your workload if your social strategy is working.
More users will want to reach out to you on social media, you’ll have a bigger audience to respond to and interact with. You might even need to hire more staff to handle this workload - but that’s a good thing.

A larger workload means a higher interaction rate with your social presence. A higher interaction rate means your strategy is working.

5. ROI
 
Perhaps most importantly, you’ll need to prove the return on investment (ROI) of your social media strategy. Your company leaders will want to see whether social media is money well-spent.

If your strategy is working, you’ll have the evidence you need to prove ROI. Your vanity metrics are a great introduction, but using deeper metrics and analytics can really drive your point across.

These five pieces of evidence can help you see the impact your hard work and strategy is having for your company.
Measure them and you’ll know whether your strategy is working.

Culled from socialmedia.com and adapted
10 30-Sep-2017 8 Best Practices To Promote Your Business On Social Media
There are not a few Nigerians who think social media is only useful for gossip. Adokie Tarila used to think that way - until his friend, Dickson Nariebo, shared the secret of how positive use of social media has transformed his business from an obscure restaurant to one of the hottest eateries in town.

A study conducted in the US showed that in 2012, 54 percent of small-business owners, needed help with social media. Two years later, that number dropped to 45 percent. This confidence seems to be translating into success, with 72 percent saying that their marketing efforts across the channels that matter, including social, email, mobile and Web, are working.

Socially savvy entrepreneurs know that it’s all about engaging the right audiences with valuable content. The online community has little tolerance for self-promoters who view social media as a means to free advertising. Given this, small-business owners face a challenge when it comes to striking a balance in using social media to engage and promote.   

Promotion and engagement are really two sides of the same coin. Engagement is rooted in consistently sharing insight and providing value every time you connect with a customer. This establishes credibility while building trust and inspiring customers to tell their friends about you. Promotion extends your engagement efforts by presenting a valuable offer that’s based on your customers’ interests and needs. Social media amplifies your efforts so you can be found and engage a wider audience to grow your business.

To put it all together, here are eight best practices for successfully engaging customers and promoting your small business through social media.

1. Follow the one-in-seven rule.

This rule is where only one of every seven posts overtly promotes your business. The remaining six should be focused on sharing valuable content, including posts from the community. This doesn’t mean you can’t promote your business in those other posts; just be sure you pair it with great content.

2. Ask conversation-starter questions.

Most people enjoy sharing their opinions, so ask Facebook fans to weigh in on topics that are relevant to your business and interesting to them. For example, a fitness center may ask fans to vote on their favorite summer sports in order to be entered into a drawing to win private lessons for them and a friend who joins the club. The questions should engage fans and inspire them to refer business while giving the business owner great insight.

3. Share your expertise.

Post little-known, fun facts in the form of questions with a special offer presented to the first person to answer correctly.

4. Provide value.

While including fun posts that reflect your personality is a must, it’s important to create content that benefits your followers. That can mean posting tips on best practices, providing access to white papers, or offering special deals on products or services.

5. Enhance the rewards for virtual check-ins.

For a specific period of time, double the points each time a customer checks in on Foursquare and triple the points each time he or she brings a friend. Their friends on social networks will see when they’ve checked in while you expand your reach exponentially.

6. Create a Pinterest board.

Make sure the board has eye-catching visuals and run a contest through it that will inspire and reward customers for their participation. Be sure to encourage them to re-pin and create their own boards that reflect the initial contest for additional social amplification of your campaign.

7. Avoid syndicated messages.

While you can use tools that allow you to write one message and have it appear on a variety of social media outlets, you risk losing the sincerity behind the message. You can use similar language as you promote your offer on different sites; just be sure to change up the words while reflecting the tone of each network.

If you find that your customers are scattered across a variety of networks, focus your efforts where they’re most active. Not sure? Ask. Otherwise, you may waste a lot of time skimming the surface of multiple networks with little results.

When small-business owners apply these best practices to social media engagement and promotion, we’ll likely see that already impressive 72 percent success statistic continue to rise.

Culled from American express.com and adapted

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